Saturday, 28 March 2015

Organisation

|| योग: कर्मसु कौशलम् ||

In the book 'Basics and Dynamics of Organisation', Mananeeya P Parameswaranji  brings out clearly as to how India was organised even till the dawn of British period. He says : Every organisation has got that central theme around which all these things revolve. Mananeeya Eknathji emphasises this point that we were one of the most well organised society. This organised condition continued even till the British period. Even during the Moghul period, the Muslim period, these organisations did exist. They performed their duties. May be there were problems, challenges, difficulties, lack of finance, lack of governmental support, rather opposition from the government. But with all that, these things were maintained even during that period.

But then, during the British Period, knowing our strength lies in these various institutions, they interfered with every system, every vyavastha and made us feel dis-organised. Mananeeya P Parameswaranji very succinctly brings out this fact. He says : The blow came during the British period. It was at two different levels. One, at the open level - taking away the financial support and making them almost incapable of surviving. The other was that systematically they made people lose faith in these institutions. People were told that these institutions were backward, not modern enough, not conducive to the situation of the present age. So these must go. They are irrelevant. They are outdated. They have no role to play. Our education system was replaced by the western education system. Every sphere met with the same fate: the faith that sustained these institutions was removed. Once the faith was lost, only the shell remained. Moreover, in the name of all kinds of reforms such as land reforms, the economic support was also withdrawn. The whole structure collapsed. That is how the organised structure in every area of life crumbled during the British period.

There was need for restructuring, or innovating, or creating something new. Towards the end of the British period, this was more particularly felt. That was what Swamiji meant when he said that we have to create an organised condition. Not that we never had it, but much of it had crumbled. It had lost connection with the life current of the people. New institutions had to be evolved.